Starbucks is redefining the concept of coffe house with their Reserve Roasteries.

Only available in a few cities around the world, the aim is to deliver more than a good cup of coffe.

Some of the shops are real piece of architectural art. The best example is the newly opened Reserve Roastery in Tokyo. Designed in collaboration with the world renowned local architect Kengo Kuma.

Starbucks Roastery Tokyo
Courtesy of Starbucks

The structure is cladded with cedar wood panels featuring hanging planters to create a buffer between the venue and the neighbouring residential properties.

The Starbucks Reserve’s logo at the top of the building provides the gravitas of a cross on a church, preparing the visitors to what they find inside.

The soft and warm timber feeling wraps the building inside/out creating a cosy environment. The space is pleasant to the senses and gives a spiritual vibe to the fabric.

Starbucks Roastery Tokyo
Courtesy of Starbucks

The interiors scream traditional crafmanship with the origami inspired faceted wooden ceiling and the cladded columns and counters.

In addition, a 17 m large copper cask dominates the scene and the attention and can be experienced by the costumers.

Starbucks Roastery Tokyo
Courtesy of Starbucks

Entrance leads to an open plan space which showcases the art of brewery. But the multi-storey building’s uniqueness is not only exhausted on the ground floor. A staircase guides through the second and third floors, where the visitor can experience a teavana bar and a cocktail bar. Here the tradition of japanese tea making joins the italian tradition on martini cocktails.

The Tokyo Roastery was inspired by the sakura trees (cherry blossoms) that can be found along the Meguro river and settling the building even more in the cultural roots of the city. Indeed it is providing an unique experience for the visitors.

Starbucks Roastery Tokyo
Courtesy of Starbucks

Let’s have a look here to discover more of the best architecture around.